Big Beliefs!

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Parents are called to one of the grandest and most intimidating tasks imaginable — training and discipling their children. Scripture makes it clear that the primary disciples and ministers in the lives of children are to be their parents. But many parents are petrified by this task.

How do I teach the Bible to my child?

How do I teach them about theology?

How do I lead family devotions?

These are common questions that every parent asks.

A Helpful Book

Thankfully, we live in a day and age where excellent resources abound to help us, as parents, in this task. David Helm, pastor of Holy Trinity Church in Chicago, has recently released a new book to help in this endeavor — Big Beliefs: Introducing Your Family to Big Truths.

Big Beliefs is a devotional that the pastors at Holy Trinity Church first created for the families to whom they were ministering. Serving as a follow-up to The Big Picture Devotional — a one-year family devotional tracing the plot line of the Bible — Big Beliefs seeks to help parents teach systematic theology to their children using the Westminster Confession.

Who Is It For?

The devotional is written for children ages 7-12 and is a family-friendly, accessible introduction to systematic theology and the Westminster Confession, written in the mid 1600s. Today, many regard this confession as one of the best, most comprehensive works on Christian Theology in the history of the Church.

The devotional includes 33 lessons, each lesson corresponding to one of the 33 chapters of the Westminster Confession (which is conveniently included in the back of the book for easy reference). Within each lesson, there are 3 devotionals. The devotional is set up to be used 3 times per week, going through 1 lesson per week. If approached in this way, the devotional would take 33 weeks to complete and enable parents to cover all areas of systematic theology with their children.

Conclusion

As a baptist, there are things in the Westminster Confession that I would not agree with (baptism, for instance). But by and large, the Westminster Confession is a wonderful summary of Christian doctrine that I would wholeheartedly use to teach my son the basics of the Christian faith. I am thankful to David Helm and the pastors at Holy Trinity Church for producing such a wonderfully written and accessible devotional to help parents guide their children through systematic theology. Though my son is not yet 2, I plan to put this on the shelf to use in just a few short years. If you have a child who is ready for such topics, I think that this would be an excellent resource for you to conciser using in your family devotions.

In accordance with FTC regulations, I would like to thank P&R Publishers for providing me with a review copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.

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